Posts Tagged ‘Whole’

How can i uncouple HO scale boxcars without doing it manually and messing up the whole train?

Thursday, February 14th, 2013

Question by Speedy2006: How can i uncouple HO scale boxcars without doing it manually and messing up the whole train?

Best answer:

Answer by Steven D
If you have knuckle couplers you can get or make a magnetic uncoupler. If you have hook and horn couplers you can use a crochet hook. Hope this helps. Model railroading lasts a life time.

What do you think? Answer below!

Can the cab on a Lionel General locomotive be replaced without taking the whole unit apart?

Monday, November 26th, 2012

Question by hx900: Can the cab on a Lionel General locomotive be replaced without taking the whole unit apart?

Best answer:

Answer by yarnlady_needsyarn
These are just two of the 568,000 listings I found when I typed Lionel Train Parts into my yahoo search box.

I hope they help.

Add your own answer in the comments!

Is it more valuable to sell a vintage lionel train set piece by piece or as a whole set?

Thursday, June 28th, 2012

Question by Sinsana: Is it more valuable to sell a vintage lionel train set piece by piece or as a whole set?

Best answer:

Answer by beernotcider
Most collectors would prefer the whole set.

What do you think? Answer below!

Musical Half and Whole Steps with Respect to Frequency (Hz) [10 points!]?

Tuesday, March 6th, 2012

Question by Sketchy Skeptic: Musical Half and Whole Steps with Respect to Frequency (Hz) [10 points!]?
I’m somewhat new to music theory and would like to truly understand it, not just memorize, so I can use it properly. I’m looking for a little more of an explanation that “because that’s the way Western music is”.

I would like to know why in a major scale we call E->F a half step and B->C a half step. An octave is a doubling of the frequency of a note, and I assume the notes A->G are spaced by some relationship of frequency (I would appreciate this relationship if you know). What I really want to know is, does this relationship of frequency actually change between E->F relative to D->E (i.e. is the expected jump in frequency between notes halved or something?) and if so, why does it sound good (do they sound like a half an interval the trained ear?), and why would they bother giving them major letter names- just laziness when making major scales?

I know that’s a lot of questions, but if you can answer them, you will have probably changed my entire outlook on music. Thanks in advance!
Cheers!

Best answer:

Answer by LACOSTZILLA
I don’t know music theory either, but I do know that Hz increases exponentially. Therefore, the jump from F3 to G3 is not as big number-wise as the jump from F4 to G4.

If you graph (easiest with a graphing calculator) the function y equals 2 to the x power,or y=2^x, you’ll notice that the interval from x=1 to x=2 is not as big as the jump from x=2 to x=3, which is not as big as the jump from x=3 to x=4, etc.
Here’s a picture of the function y=2^x http://hotmath.com/images/gt/lessons/genericalg1/exponential_graph.gif

I think you may get more (and better, and more useful) responses if you ask again somewhere else entirely (not Y! Answers). Good luck, and sorry if I couldn’t help

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!

Musical Half and Whole Steps with Respect to Frequency (Hz) [10 points!]?

Tuesday, December 20th, 2011

Question by Sketchy Skeptic: Musical Half and Whole Steps with Respect to Frequency (Hz) [10 points!]?
I’m somewhat new to music theory and would like to truly understand it, not just memorize, so I can use it properly. I’m looking for a little more of an explanation that “because that’s the way Western music is”.

I would like to know why in a major scale we call E->F a half step and B->C a half step. An octave is a doubling of the frequency of a note, and I assume the notes A->G are spaced by some relationship of frequency (I would appreciate this relationship if you know). What I really want to know is, does this relationship of frequency actually change between E->F relative to D->E (i.e. is the expected jump in frequency between notes halved or something?) and if so, why does it sound good (do they sound like a half an interval the trained ear?), and why would they bother giving them major letter names- just laziness when making major scales?

I know that’s a lot of questions, but if you can answer them, you will have probably changed my entire outlook on music. Thanks in advance!
Cheers!

Best answer:

Answer by YahooUser
I’ll just answer one, see if you can figure out the rest.
One octave=doubling of frequency
There are 12 notes in one octave (never mind what they are called, 12 is the relevant number).

Each note differs from the previous ( and consequently the next one) by the 12th root of 2 which is about 1.0596. So the frequency of D is 1.0596x frequency of the (preceding) C and so on.

Note that this spacing makes the notes belong to a geometric, rather than arithmetic, progression.

Now, let’s introduce the notes’ names: A, B, C etc. We stop at G: that is seven names and we have 12 notes, so we add # (or ♭if you go backward … :-)) to each name. Problem: we now have 14 names for 12 notes! 2 have to go and you know which ones went.

Now,why 12 notes, why flats and sharps and so on: search the net, it is a long story. You may want to read why Bach composed the Preludes for the Well Tempered Clavier.

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!

Toy Train Whole Car

Friday, May 13th, 2011

Toy Train Whole Car

Image by loadstone
i wonder how many have drawn on that kids face…

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