What’s the fastest way to teach my nephews the meaning of the word respect?

Question by Gloria: What’s the fastest way to teach my nephews the meaning of the word respect?
My brother’s boys are staying at my house for a week and all they want to do is act like little macho monsters, running around pretending to attack each other in violent re-enactments of how European settlers committed genocide and rape against Native Americans (they call it “Cowboys and Indians”).

How can I teach them respect for women and Native Americans within one short week?

Best answer:

Answer by Someone
tell them everybody is equal because we are all the same but just look different from eachother. It is wrong the way they treat others and they should treat others how they would like to be treated

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Musical Half and Whole Steps with Respect to Frequency (Hz) [10 points!]?

Question by Sketchy Skeptic: Musical Half and Whole Steps with Respect to Frequency (Hz) [10 points!]?
I’m somewhat new to music theory and would like to truly understand it, not just memorize, so I can use it properly. I’m looking for a little more of an explanation that “because that’s the way Western music is”.

I would like to know why in a major scale we call E->F a half step and B->C a half step. An octave is a doubling of the frequency of a note, and I assume the notes A->G are spaced by some relationship of frequency (I would appreciate this relationship if you know). What I really want to know is, does this relationship of frequency actually change between E->F relative to D->E (i.e. is the expected jump in frequency between notes halved or something?) and if so, why does it sound good (do they sound like a half an interval the trained ear?), and why would they bother giving them major letter names- just laziness when making major scales?

I know that’s a lot of questions, but if you can answer them, you will have probably changed my entire outlook on music. Thanks in advance!
Cheers!

Best answer:

Answer by LACOSTZILLA
I don’t know music theory either, but I do know that Hz increases exponentially. Therefore, the jump from F3 to G3 is not as big number-wise as the jump from F4 to G4.

If you graph (easiest with a graphing calculator) the function y equals 2 to the x power,or y=2^x, you’ll notice that the interval from x=1 to x=2 is not as big as the jump from x=2 to x=3, which is not as big as the jump from x=3 to x=4, etc.
Here’s a picture of the function y=2^x http://hotmath.com/images/gt/lessons/genericalg1/exponential_graph.gif

I think you may get more (and better, and more useful) responses if you ask again somewhere else entirely (not Y! Answers). Good luck, and sorry if I couldn’t help

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!

Musical Half and Whole Steps with Respect to Frequency (Hz) [10 points!]?

Question by Sketchy Skeptic: Musical Half and Whole Steps with Respect to Frequency (Hz) [10 points!]?
I’m somewhat new to music theory and would like to truly understand it, not just memorize, so I can use it properly. I’m looking for a little more of an explanation that “because that’s the way Western music is”.

I would like to know why in a major scale we call E->F a half step and B->C a half step. An octave is a doubling of the frequency of a note, and I assume the notes A->G are spaced by some relationship of frequency (I would appreciate this relationship if you know). What I really want to know is, does this relationship of frequency actually change between E->F relative to D->E (i.e. is the expected jump in frequency between notes halved or something?) and if so, why does it sound good (do they sound like a half an interval the trained ear?), and why would they bother giving them major letter names- just laziness when making major scales?

I know that’s a lot of questions, but if you can answer them, you will have probably changed my entire outlook on music. Thanks in advance!
Cheers!

Best answer:

Answer by YahooUser
I’ll just answer one, see if you can figure out the rest.
One octave=doubling of frequency
There are 12 notes in one octave (never mind what they are called, 12 is the relevant number).

Each note differs from the previous ( and consequently the next one) by the 12th root of 2 which is about 1.0596. So the frequency of D is 1.0596x frequency of the (preceding) C and so on.

Note that this spacing makes the notes belong to a geometric, rather than arithmetic, progression.

Now, let’s introduce the notes’ names: A, B, C etc. We stop at G: that is seven names and we have 12 notes, so we add # (or ♭if you go backward … :-)) to each name. Problem: we now have 14 names for 12 notes! 2 have to go and you know which ones went.

Now,why 12 notes, why flats and sharps and so on: search the net, it is a long story. You may want to read why Bach composed the Preludes for the Well Tempered Clavier.

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!