Posts Tagged ‘Most’

What were the “40 Most Sensational Soft Rock Songs”?

Friday, February 15th, 2013

Question by Jen: What were the “40 Most Sensational Soft Rock Songs”?
This was one of the count down shows on VH1. I really want a list so I can download them!

Best answer:

Answer by ♫~KinomiyaMichiru ♥s K-On!~♫
The Program was actually called *Softsational* instead of *Sensational*.

40. Bertie Higgins – “Key Largo”

39. David Soul – “Don’t Give Up On Us”

38. Peter Frampton – “Baby, I Love Your Way”

37. Leo Sayer – “When I Need You ”

36. 10cc – “I’m Not in Love”

35. Extreme – “More Than Words”

34. Dan Hill – “Sometimes When We Touch”

33. Cat Stevens – “Peace Train”

32. Kenny Loggins – “This is It”

31. Richard Marx – “Hold On To The Nights”

30. Andrew Gold – “Lonely Boy”

29. Debby Boone – “You Light Up My Life”

28. America – “Horse With No Name”

27. Lionel Richie – “Hello”

26. Harry Chapin – “Cat’s In The Cradle”

25. Anne Murray – “You Needed Me”

24. Phil Collins – “One More Night”

23. REO Speedwagon – “I Can’t Fight This Feeling”

22. Roberta Flack & Peabo Bryson – “Tonight, I Celebrate My Love”

21. Orleans – “Still the One”

20. Captain & Tennille – “Do That To Me One More Time”

19. Michael Bolton – “How Am I Supposed to Live Without You”

18. Toto – “Rosanna”

17. Juice Newton – “Angel Of The Morning”

16. Bread – “Baby I’m – A Want You”

15. Journey – “Open Arms”

14. Seals & Crofts – “Summer Breeze”

13. Carpenters – “Superstar”

12. Starland Vocal Band – “Afternoon Delight”

11. Olivia Newton-John – “I Honestly Love You”

10. Chuck Mangione – “Feels So Good”

09. Hall and Oates – “One On One”

08. The Doobie Brothers – “What A Fool Believes”

07. Kansas – “Dust In The Wind”

06. Air Supply – “Making Love Out Of Nothing At All”

05. Chicago – “If You Leave Me Now”

04. Barry Manilow – “Mandy”

03. Rupert Holmes – “Escape (The Pina Colada Song)”

02. Styx – “Babe”

01. Christopher Cross – “Sailing”

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!

Do most model airplane kit collectors buy the kits to assemble them or just to keep the kits as collectibles?

Thursday, January 31st, 2013

Question by Christmas Fan: Do most model airplane kit collectors buy the kits to assemble them or just to keep the kits as collectibles?
I am referring to the old kits from the 1960s, 70s and 80s (Airfix, Frog, Monogram, Revell, MPC, etc.).

Best answer:

Answer by Sophie B
Most people buy them to build them initially, but soon end up with way more than they can ever build in this lifetime….

Give your answer to this question below!

HD: The Most Amazing Train Ever! 19G With Many Rare Locomotives!

Saturday, November 17th, 2012

When I got a message from a fellow railfan on a Yahoo group that 19G had 8 engines all of Conrail heritage… NS D8-40CW 8420 NS D8-40CW 8315 NS GP38-2 5329 NS GP38-2 5277 “CRQ” CSX GP15-1 1554 “CRQ” NS GP38-2 5312 NS SD45-2 1705 NS SD45-2 1703 …I fell on the floor, started twitching, blacked out, and woke up to an EMS with an AED. The first scene is 19G barrelling through Myerstown in good light at HP 79.9, there is a hotbox / dragging equipment detector here. Unfortunately, when I got up to Hershey to catch him working (that video will be up soon), the sun had disappeared, but nevertheless, I got to catch it again chugging up to speed. The date is April 2, 2009, in the afternoon. RARITIES: CSX 1554 one of only 2 GP15-1’s in Conrail paint, NS 1705 and 1703, 2 of only 6 SD45-2’s on the system. Plus the fact that 8 exConrail units got lashed together!

North East model railway – DMU Cab Ride…. Calling most stations

Saturday, April 28th, 2012

Another DMU Cab ride taking a different route round the stations after the secenry is finished. There are many different routes any of the trains can take around Trenholme Junction.
Video Rating: 5 / 5

Model Trains at the MOST in Syracuse

Thursday, April 12th, 2012

Model Trains at the MOST in Syracuse

Image by mark.hogan
We passed some time at the Museum of Science and Technology in Syracuse NY.
It wasn’t very impressive but they did have a great model train set.

About how much space would I need to build a model HO scale railroad hobby of the U.K. or most of California?

Friday, March 9th, 2012

Question by : About how much space would I need to build a model HO scale railroad hobby of the U.K. or most of California?
I would love to do such a model railroad hobby but I’m ONLY GUESSING that would take up half a city but I’m hoping someone might know how I would figure out such a question

Best answer:

Answer by Boyaki
HO scale is 1:87 scale size.

The UK has a total land area of 241,930 sq km.

So, the UK in HO scale would be around 2781 sq km.

The state of Rhode Island, if I’m figuring correctly, is around 1700 sq km.

What do you think? Answer below!

Most forms of transportation burn petrol for example ships, trucks, planes, diesel-electric trains.?

Tuesday, November 8th, 2011

Question by som1700: Most forms of transportation burn petrol for example ships, trucks, planes, diesel-electric trains.?
Is the the statement above correct?

Best answer:

Answer by returnthefly
yup, correct.

What do you think? Answer below!

History Of Ho-Scale Trains – How H0-Scale Got Started And Became The Most Popular In The World

Monday, October 17th, 2011

In 1921, the “double zero” or 00 scale train (1:76) was introduced in the United Kingdom.  This train was and remains the most popular scale in the UK and runs on the same gauge track as the H0 scale trains, although the actual trains and rolling stock are a larger scale.  In the 1930’s the H0 scale was introduced as an alternative to the 00, but never really grabbed a foothold in the UK.  At 1:87, the H0 scale (pronounced h-oh, not h-zero, and not ho) is approximately half the scale of the 0 (zero) scale.  Early scales were denoted by numbers like 0, 1,2, and 3. In the United States, Japan and Australia, H0 is more popularly denoted as HO.

The H0 scale became very popular in the United States in the late 1950’s which is when model railroads started to become less like toys and more realistic due to hobbyist demand.  Smaller sized trains by their very nature allow enthusiasts to fit more “scale miles” into the same space as larger trains, while giving up a little in ruggedness.  Smaller trains also allow more detailed scenery to be created in the space.

In the 1960’s, the 0 scale began to decline in response to the rise in the H0 scale’s popularity.  Even manufacturer’s who had previously eschewed the scale like Gilbert (who made the popular American Flyer) began making the more popular scale. Today the H0 scale is the most popular scale in the US as well as in most of Europe.  Although 00 still maintains its top spot in England, the H0 scale does exist.  The British 1:87 Scale Society was formed in the mid 1990’s to promote the scale and provide support to those modelers who enjoy it.

Early track for the H0 trains were sold in sections, usually 9 inches long and came in straight sections and curved sections of various radii.  Track “code” is a measurement of the height of the rail as measured in thousandths of an inch.  Most popular is probably Code 100 which is .100 inches high.  This track is fairly heavy for the HO scale and can accept 00 trains and older deep wheel flange trains as well.  For that reason, some purists opt to make their own finescale track to reduce the size.

Due to the widespread popularity of HO scale trains throughout most of the world, manufacturers make a wide array of locomotives, rolling stock (cars and carriages), track, and scenery.  You can buy fully ready to run models, easy to assemble kits, or Craftsman kits which require much more assembly and skill and may contain several hundred parts.  Price and quality also varies widely, so be sure you know what you are buying, as with anything else, you get what you pay for in most cases.

Henry Michael is a model train enthusiast who enjoys sharing his knowledge and experience with others to help them get the most out of this exciting hobby.  For more information on on Due to the widespread popularity of HO scale trains, visit my website at http://www.modeltrainenthusiast.com/ and learn how easy it is for you to get involved with model railroading.  It will help you to avoid mistakes that most beginners make.  If you are more experienced, it will give you a different perspective on things you maybe doing or would like to do.

Article from articlesbase.com

HO scale train sets – Why Are They the Most Popular Scale Trains?

Sunday, October 9th, 2011

HO scale train sets are the worlds’ most popular sized model railways for a number of reasons: cost, space requirements, and ease of component availability figure highly amongst these. In a perfect world, I’d be modeling in On30, but the reality of my own situation – present and likely future is that HO – that is, a 1/87th scale representation of the real world – is the track I’ll follow for pretty much those three reasons I listed above. Bachmann, the world’s biggest maker of model trains has an extensive range of American prototype locomotive and rolling stock for the train fan. For the newcomer, Bachmann’s HO train sets, ready to run out of the box, offer the perfect starting point.

Big… and not so big.

Size – a good place to start.

By far the most popular of the big train sizes is O gauge – that’s trains built to a scale of 1/48th the size of the real thing, running on rails spaced 1.25″ apart. Historically, O gauge has some impressive claims to be the parent of all current model railroad scales and gauges. The first model trains, produced in Germany around the beginning of the 20th century were close to 1/48th scale and ran on 1.25″ wide tracks. When model train manufacturing got under way here in the USA, those iconic brands Lionel and American Flyer built their trains to run on those very same 1.25″ spaced tracks.

The little trains began to appear in numbers after World War Two and by the 1960s, commercial production of small-sized, HO gauge trains far outstripped production of O gauge. Initially, it was the British who came up with the idea of this smaller size – trains that could run on tracks spaced just 0.65″ apart. German manufacturer Marklin launched its range of small trains running on 0.65″ (or 16.5mm) spaced tracks in 1935, but unlike British and German rival train-makers, Marklin chose to make its trains to scale of 1/87th the size of the real thing. Since Marklin’s O gauge trains were built to a scale of 1/43rd, this new, smaller size was very conveniently half the size of the big ‘uns – hence Half O gauge, or HO as it is universally known today. Approximately 66% of all model train lovers rate HO as their favorite scale.

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HO gauge – the more bangs for your bucks interface.

The main reason for the popularity of HO amongst modelers is the perception of what you can achieve in this scale in a given space. Look through the pages of any of the well-known magazines devoted to the hobby and you’ll see vast basement railroad empires with a staggering amounts of nano-scenic detail, beautifully rendered and weathered locomotives and rolling stock. The overall impression can be breathtaking and a close-up and personal scrutiny – often known as “rivet-counting”- shows just how much miniature detail can be incorporated even at this degree of shrinkage. Inspiring indeed, but there are plenty of us who don’t have and are never likely to have basements. HO model-railroading is flexible and adaptable enough to cater for the space-deprived modeler, who has to make do with maybe just 8-10 feet of wall space, maybe 12″ wide – just enough to represent the end of the line of some long-forgotten spur of the Hooterville Central RR in its glory days. These railroaders often outdo us all when it comes to atmosphere, rivets, warts and all.

The industry, has of course, responded to the market. For the HO gauge modeler, there is a huge array of off-the-shelf train sets, locomotives, cars, buildings and track. As you progress through the hobby, more specialized manufacturers supply everything to cater for scratch-building or kit-bashing needs. If you want it, you can source and buy everything from a more authentic brake-wheel for your favorite caboose right up to a gorgeous, and seriously expensive, hand-built, brass locomotive.

Perhaps the final reason for choosing HO ahead of the larger alternatives is the cost. Yes, there are some surprisingly cheap O gauge items out there – Bachmann’s lovely On30 2-8-0 Consolidation is a give-away at around 7.00 – but the fact remains that model-railroading in HO, part for part and piece for piece, is going to be a lot cheaper than opting for any of the bigger scales. Next time you look at an HO gauge layout that really gets your heart pounding, just remember that to do the same thing in O gauge is going to take twice the space and the cost of all the components will be considerably higher as well.

Liam is an avid collector of model trains and a gamer enthusiastic. He is also a webmaster of an online hobby shop: Spicy-Gifts-Hobbies.com.
So Stop by and visit his site for some great offers of Christmas trains, Lionel train sets, Bachmann trains and more..

Article from articlesbase.com

In Model Trains what is better HO or N i mean the most common?

Monday, September 26th, 2011

Question by soulhunterx04: In Model Trains what is better HO or N i mean the most common?
thanks for the help

Best answer:

Answer by billrussell42
HO is probably the most common.

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What do you think? Answer below!

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