Posts Tagged ‘Curve’

NS 227 Container Train Stops on Horseshoe Curve July 13 2009

Monday, November 26th, 2012

Watch In High Definition A Norfolk Southern container train NS 227 comes to a stop on Horseshoe Curve July 13 2009. I edited 3 minutes of video out of this clip to make this fit on You Tube. Thank you NS6677 for the train number.

How much space is required for a 22″ radius curve in HO scale.?

Sunday, September 23rd, 2012

Question by kylekessler1: How much space is required for a 22″ radius curve in HO scale.?
This question pertains to HO scale model railroading. It is my intention to include 22″ radius curves on a new layout I’m building, but I need to know how much actual space is required for each complete curve.

Best answer:

Answer by noctis52
About 4 feet for a half circle.

Give your answer to this question below!

Train Takes Curve in Road

Sunday, June 10th, 2012

Train Takes Curve in Road
electric trains
Image by RightBrainPhotography

Is this a good formula to find the circumference of a model railroad track curve?

Wednesday, June 6th, 2012

Question by Nineteen-Twenty by Ten-Eighty Pixels 🙂: Is this a good formula to find the circumference of a model railroad track curve?
Before you say anything, this has nothing to do with homework

I think I’ve got a good formula for figuring it out, but I just want to run it by anyone else into H0 scale model railroading.

If it took 3 curves to make a 90 degree turn then each piece would be 30 degrees.

If it took 4 curves to make a 90 degree turn then each piece would be 22.5 degrees.

So count the number of pieces it takes to make a 90 degree curve

Divide 90 by the number of track pieces needed

90 degrees / 3 curves = 30 degrees each curve

90 degrees / 4 curves = 22.5 degrees each curve

To make sure it is correct, you times the number of curves by the amount of degrees of each piece, and if the answer is 90, then it is right.

Formula:
X = degrees
Y = per track piece
Z = Track pieces

90X / # of Z needed to make 90X = # of XY
# of Z needed to make 90X x # of XY = 90X

Example:
90 / 3 = 30
3 x 30 = 90

90 / 4 = 22.5
4 x 22.5 = 90

Would this formula be suitable to figure out the circumference of each track piece as long as each curve track used is the same?

Best answer:

Answer by Mather
Your formula seems to be going around in circles. If you want to find the length of a curved piece, you would be best to make a complete circle, but if you can make exactly 90 deg. that’s fine.

The measure the radius, that is distance from the centre of the circle to the edge of the track (inside, middle or outside, depending on which measure you want.

The circumference of the circle is pi*radius^2, where ^2 = squared, and pi is approximately equal to 3.14.

Once you have the circumference of the circle, you can divide by the number of track pieces to find the length of each piece.

You can also measure the length of a piece by multiplying the radius by the angle in radians. 90 degrees = pi/2 radians. So you could also do it that way, but you always need to know the radius of the circle.

Add your own answer in the comments!

Is this a good formula to find the circumference of a model railroad track curve?

Wednesday, June 6th, 2012

Question by Nineteen-Twenty by Ten-Eighty Pixels 🙂: Is this a good formula to find the circumference of a model railroad track curve?
Before you say anything, this has nothing to do with homework

I think I’ve got a good formula for figuring it out, but I just want to run it by anyone else into H0 scale model railroading.

If it took 3 curves to make a 90 degree turn then each piece would be 30 degrees.

If it took 4 curves to make a 90 degree turn then each piece would be 22.5 degrees.

So count the number of pieces it takes to make a 90 degree curve

Divide 90 by the number of track pieces needed

90 degrees / 3 curves = 30 degrees each curve

90 degrees / 4 curves = 22.5 degrees each curve

To make sure it is correct, you times the number of curves by the amount of degrees of each piece, and if the answer is 90, then it is right.

Formula:
X = degrees
Y = per track piece
Z = Track pieces

90X / # of Z needed to make 90X = # of XY
# of Z needed to make 90X x # of XY = 90X

Example:
90 / 3 = 30
3 x 30 = 90

90 / 4 = 22.5
4 x 22.5 = 90

Would this formula be suitable to figure out the circumference of each track piece as long as each curve track used is the same?

Best answer:

Answer by Wdlane
Hi,

Here is a NO math answer that will get you the center line for the best model railroad curves you can make without sending your brain into spastic convulsions. Go to a lumber yard (Or Lowes or Home Depot) and look for long square trim or pine as long and perfectly clear as possible. The end result you want is a 3/4″ x 3/4″ piece of wood. You should be able to get up to 16 feet long.

Tack the wood strip on the center line at the beginning of where you need the curve to start. Tack the other end of the strip on the center line of where the curve needs to stop. Draw the line you get. Put down your flex track to that center line. DONE! You get a VERY natural looking varied radius curve complete with easements with almost no math involved. It will look much better then trying to force the use of sectional track.

Good Luck
Bill Lane
www.lanestrains.com

Add your own answer in the comments!

Curve at York Mill in Pall Mall (TN) — G-Scale Model Train at the Cheekwood Botanical Garden Nashville (TN) July 2011

Saturday, March 24th, 2012

Curve at York Mill in Pall Mall (TN) — G-Scale Model Train at the Cheekwood Botanical Garden Nashville (TN) July 2011

Image by Ron Cogswell
Image by Ron Cogswell on July 19, 2011, using a Nikon D80 and minor Photoshop effects.

DSC_0042

Watching the curve ahead

Thursday, January 5th, 2012

Watching the curve ahead

Image by abrinsky
At Batasia Loop, on the toy train between Darjeeling and Ghum.

will a 2-8-2 ho scale model train steam locomotive work on a 18 inch curve radius?

Friday, August 26th, 2011

Question by Silentman: will a 2-8-2 ho scale model train steam locomotive work on a 18 inch curve radius?
I have a ho scale model train layout with an 18 inch curve radius that I just finished building and I would like to know if a 2-8-2 ho scale steam locomotive will work on my layout

Best answer:

Answer by david c
Most of these locomotives are designed to run on 22′ plus curves and it is recommended that they are oprerated on such curves. All that said, however, they do run on 18′ curves. The manufacturer does not recommend it, but they can. Slightly bigger chance of derailing though, but with properly aligned tracks and joints properly smoothed out, you should be OK. You might want to consider slowing them down in curves if you have issues with derailment.

Add your own answer in the comments!

Docklands light railway curve

Friday, July 15th, 2011

Docklands light railway curve

Image by Elsie esq.
With its tight curves and steep gradients I find it dificult to regard the DLR as a real railway. More of a giant layout for 1/1th scale model trains.

Lionel FasTrack O36 Curve Track 4-Pack

Sunday, July 3rd, 2011

[wpramazon asin=”B0006KSMHW”]

Subscribe to RSS feed

Dallas Cowboys vs. New York Jets    Watch Pittsburgh Steelers vs Baltimore Ravens live stream, NFL, week 1, 11.09.2011  Live TV Streams Discussions