Acela Express #2004

Acela Express #2004
electric trains
Image by cliff1066™
Although the design of the trains, with identical 6,000 horsepower (4,474 kW) power cars at each end which operate on a voltage of 11,000 volts AC, and either 25 or 60 Hertz (cycles per second) frequency, resemble France’s TGV, the only components directly derived from the TGV are the 4 asynchronous AC traction electric motors (per power car). The tilting carriages are based upon Bombardier’s earlier LRC trains rather than the TGV’s articulated trailers, and the locomotives and passenger cars are much heavier than those of the TGV in order to meet the United States Federal Railroad Administration’s different approach to rail crash standards.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acela_Express

Acela Express #2004

Acela Express #2004
electric trains
Image by cliff1066™
The Tier II crash standards, adopted in 1999, have also resulted in the passenger cars being designed without steps and trapdoors, which means that the trainsets can only serve stations with high-level platforms — this currently restricts them to lines with high-level platforms such as the Northeast Corridor. Bombardier have since used the Acela Express’s carriage design and a non-electric variant of the power car for their experimental JetTrain.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acela_Express

Acela Express #2004

Acela Express #2004
electric trains
Image by cliff1066™
The Acela name was announced in 1999, and was originally intended as a rebranding of most of Amtrak’s Northeast services, forming three levels – Acela Express, Acela Regional and Acela Commuter. Due to confusion between the lower-speed Acela Regional trains and the Acela Express – as the name is (intentionally) evocative of acceleration – the Acela branding was removed from what is now the Regional service in 2003.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acela_Express

Acela Express First Class Car

Acela Express First Class Car
electric trains
Image by cliff1066™
The Acela Express has the most on-board crew members on the NEC. The Acela crew consists of a conductor, assistant conductor, cafe attendant, two first class attendants and an engineer. Regional trains only have a head conductor, one or two assistants, a cafe attendant and an engineer. The Acela changes conductors at New York.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acela_Express

Acela Express #2004

Acela Express #2004
electric trains
Image by cliff1066™
Acela Express (often called simply Acela) is the name used by Amtrak for the high-speed tilting train service operating between Washington, D.C. and Boston via Baltimore, Philadelphia, and New York along the Northeast Corridor (NEC) in the Northeast United States. The tilting design allows the train to travel at higher speeds on the sharply curved NEC without disturbing passengers, by lowering lateral G-forces.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acela_Express

Acela Express #2004

Acela Express #2004
electric trains
Image by cliff1066™
Acela Express trains are the only true high-speed trainsets in the United States. This has made the trains very popular, and by some reckoning, Amtrak has captured over half of the market share of travelers between Washington and New York. Outside of stations, Acela runs at speeds between 75 mph (120 km/h) and 150 mph (241 km/h), depending on track conditions.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acela_Express

The Acela Express Review (Part 2)

And, the rest of my look at the Acela set. I would definitely recommend getting this set if you can get it, purely on its beautiful detail, paint job, and smooth running. Even if modern trains aren’t usually your favourite, this could be the one for you… However, they are getting hard to find now. I searched for this one for the better part of a year. Then, as a nice partner train, you can get the Acela HHP-8 engine, and some Amfleet cars to go with it.