Posts Tagged ‘1940’

EBT 15, Baldwin, Narrow Gauge, 2-8-2, Mikado, Built 1940, Rockhill Furnace PA; Undated

Friday, October 26th, 2012

EBT 15, Baldwin, Narrow Gauge, 2-8-2, Mikado, Built 1940, Rockhill Furnace PA; Undated
model railroads
Image by San Diego Model Railroad Museum
Description: EBT 15, Baldwin, Narrow Gauge, 2-8-2, Mikado, Built 1940, Rockhill Furnace PA; Undated
Copyright: Brenda M. Bailey
Object ID: BMBSlides_06988
Repository: San Diego Model Railroad Museum Library

i have a 1940 union pacific lionel train set. how much would that be to sell it on like an antique thing.?

Tuesday, July 17th, 2012

Question by justin b: i have a 1940 union pacific lionel train set. how much would that be to sell it on like an antique thing.?
and if possible probably a place to sell it on also.

Best answer:

Answer by EclipseRD
Well it’s going to depend on a number of factors: The specific model/set, how rare it is, how many were built and more than anything else – It’s condition (including, boxes, power transformers and other accessories).

There are a number of books out there that are analogous to the used automobile industry “blue books” which will give you a “ball park” idea on what the model/set could go for.

Again depending on the condition and desirability of your item could easily dictate on where you would want to sell it. Dealers are usually more than happy to put your item on consignment for anywhere from 10-30% commission. If it’s really rare they might be interested in buying it outright. This can be a gray area as they may offer much less than they would sell for in order to make a profit.

Taking it to a train show or other model event and selling it yourself is also an option. Consider the price to purchase table space and entrance fees into how much you want to sell it for. Train “swap meets” auctions and club classified are also great resources.

Do some research for “toy train” clubs/organizations in your area. If you find one, contact them and solicit interest for your set. Members with a keen interest in your set might want certain pieces and not others and you will need to decide if you want to split the set up or not. It might be what makes it sell. Again, someone may steer you in a direction other than what I’ve suggested.

I’ll bring up Ebay (and online auction houses in genral) last since it’s the most risky. Not from a scam point of view but from a profit point of view. Investigate your model/set’s worth as much as possible before you plan on thinking of putting it on Ebay. Review Ebay’s item listing and selling fees and consider what you need out of the “deal” to make it worth it to you. Ebay can net you a lot of money but don’t list the item at “Junkman mentality” prices and out price the item. If you are familiar with online auctions then great. If not, I would suggest a lot of study and education to understand how they work and what you need to know in order to successfully sell on them.

Good luck to you!

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!

1940 Home Movie: Lionel Trains for Christmas!

Saturday, June 11th, 2011

Grandpa’s 1940 home movie of my dad’s Lionel train set, “The Santa Claus Special,” followed by mid-50’s clip of a set belonging to Dad’s cousin, Matt. My dad and his parents lived on the ground floor of 119-14 Seventh Avenue in College Point, NY, while Dad’s Aunt Eleanor and Uncle “Matt” (Matthias) lived on the second floor. For Christmas 1940, Uncle Matt, who was a carpenter, built a layout for Dad’s new electric train set. It sat on two sawhorses in the living room. Note the classic props, including the famous switchman or watchman popping out of his shelter for each passing train. Also note my father’s hand on the controls at the bottom of the frame in several scenes – he was 11 going on 12 at the time. In the mid-1950’s clip, Uncle Matt’s teenage son Matthias 3rd operates his set in the basement. Note that many of the props are from the set that belonged to Dad. Although the footage in this sequence is not as sharply focused, there is a much better view of the hand controls – quite a contraption, they were. Where are these trains now? Some of them wound up in the destructive little hands of wicked little me and my younger brother. After many staged train wrecks and head-on collisions, their battered hulks were discarded. What a shame – they’d be a treasure now. I’m not an expert on Lionel Trains – so I’m asking all you Lionel fans out there to please help me identify these models. Thanks!! 16mm Kodachrome photography by Gustave Martens. A YouTube Presentation by
Video Rating: 4 / 5

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